An Introduction to Event History Analysis & a Crash Course in Stata, 18 to 20 June 2007

An Introduction to Event History Analysis, Chris Zorn (University of South Carolina) & Crash Course in Stata, Mark Pickup (University of Oxford)

18th to 20th June, 2007

The courses will be taught at the Department of Politics and International Relations, Manor Road Building, Oxford.

Registration is closed.

The Crash Course in Stata will take place on Monday morning (18 June) from 9:30am-1pm. An Introduction to Event History Analysis will begin on Monday afternoon (18 to 20 June) from 2-5:30pm and all day on Tuesday and Wednesday (19-20 June) from 9:30am-5:30pm. You are invitited to apply for either course or both according to your interests. Please indicate on the registration form which course(s) you would like to attend. Further details of each course are as follows...

Crash Course in Stata

The Crash Course in Stata will present the basics of the Stata statistical package. Stata is a full data management program with excellent statistical and graphical capabilities. Stata is one of the most frequently used statistical packages in the social sciences. For more information about Stata, visit www.stata.com.

Mark Pickup is Post-doctoral Fellow in Quantitative Methods in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Nuffield College, University of Oxford. He has published articles in Canadian Journal of Political Science and Electoral Studies.

An Introduction to Event History Analysis

Event history analysis (also know as ‘survival analysis’ or ‘hazard models’) is among the fastest-growing tools for analyzing social science data. This course offers an introduction to event history models, with an emphasis on their use and interpretation in the study of economic, political and social phenomena. The course will begin with an overview of the collection and coding of event history data, and will discuss univariate and bivariate approaches to the analysis of such data. It will then move on to a thorough overview of parametric and semiparametric approaches, including estimation, interpretation, and diagnostics. The course will conclude with discussions of variations on standard models, including models for discrete mixtures of survival data.

The course requires no prior knowledge of event history models, but does assume familiarity with multivariate regression for generalized linear models.

The practical aspect of the course will make use of Stata software, although there will also be some discussion of applications in R. Those who are unfamiliar with Stata are recommended to attend the Crash Course in Stata on the morning of Monday 18th June.

Chris Zorn is Professor of Political Science at the University of South Carolina. His current research examines a range of topics in American and international political institutions, including federal government litigation, US Supreme Court decision-making, and international relations, as well as research on event count, survival, and panel data models for quantitative research. He is the author of articles in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, and he currently sits on the Excecutive Council of the Midwest Political Science Association, and on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Conflict Resolution.

Costs

The costs for attending the courses will be:

  • Participants from ECPR-member institutions (both UK and abroad): Crash Course in Stata - £37.50; An Introduction to Event History Analysis - £187.50
  • Participants from UK non-ECPR academic institutions: Crash Course in Stata - £42.50; An Introduction to Event History Analysis - £212.50
  • Participants from non-UK non-ECPR academic institutions: Crash Course in Stata - £50; An Introduction to Event History Analysis - £250
  • Participants from non-academic institutions: Crash Course in Stata - £75; An Introduction to Event History Analysis - £375

Participants from ECPR-member institutions (both UK and abroad) are also eligible to apply for travel and accommodation costs through the ECPR's mobility fund, and for fees through its scholarship fund. Details on the ECPR mobility fund.

In order to stimulate the uptake of high quality training courses the ESRC Research Resources Board makes available 50 bursaries each year for up to £ 1,000 each to enable HEFCE-funded staff in the UK engaged in teaching methods or supervising research to update their skills. Contract researchers working in HEIs are also eligible to apply. For further details and an application form, visit: http://www.ccsr.ac.uk/methods/bursaries/.

Accommodation

Unfortunately, we are unable to offer accommodation for this course. If you would like to make your own arrangements to stay in Oxford, you can find information about accommodation on the Oxford City website or on the Oxford Daily Information website.

Registration

Registration is closed.